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Sharia in action in Sudan: Woman faces flogging for uncovered hair

By Robert Spencer

AmiraOsmanHamad.jpg“Moreover, freedom in America is indivisible from the freedom to practice one’s religion. That is why there is a mosque in every state in our union, and over 1,200 mosques within our borders. That’s why the United States government has gone to court to protect the right of women and girls to wear the hijab and to punish those who would deny it.” — Barack Obama, Cairo, June 4, 2009

But who will go to court, or do anything at all, in the U.S. or Sudan or anywhere else, to protect the right of women and girls not to wear the hijab and to punish those who would deny it?

“Sudanese woman Amira Osman Hamed faces flogging for uncovered hair,” from AFP, September 9 (thanks to Kenneth):

A SUDANESE woman says she’s prepared to be flogged to defend the right to leave her hair uncovered in defiance of a Taliban-like law.Amira Osman Hamed faces a possible whipping if convicted at a trial which could come on September 19.

Under Sudanese law, her hair – and that of all women – is supposed to be covered with a “hijab”, but Ms Hamed refuses.

The 35-year-old’s case has drawn support from civil rights activists and is the latest to highlight Sudan’s series of laws governing morality, which took effect after the 1989 Islamist-backed coup by President Omar al-Bashir.

“They want us to be like Taliban women,” Ms Hamed said in an interview with AFP, referring to the fundamentalist rebel movement in Afghanistan.

She is charged under Article 152 which prohibits “indecent” clothing….

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